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Two hundred people associated with Red Sox participate in coronavirus study

Two hundred people associated with the Red Sox, including some of the players and coaches, participated in a large study designed to give researchers some of the data needed to determine the scope of coronavirus in the United States.

Stanford, USC, and the Sports Medicine Research and Testing Laboratory are conducting a simple at-home blood test for coronavirus antibodies in conjunction with Major League Baseball.

The pinprick testing detects the presence of two antibodies produced by having the coronavirus, even if the person was asymptomatic.

What are expected to be 10,000 tests will provide a wide sample size to determine the rate of infections.

All but three teams agreed to take part in the testing, according to The Athletic. The study includes players, coaches, team employees, family members, and part-time ballpark workers. The idea was to get a wide swath of age, gender, location, ethnicity and socioeconomic backgrounds.

The study will not help determine when to restart games. MLB’s participation was only in the interest of public welfare.

A MLB spokesman declined to say which teams did not participate.

Any participant who tests positive for the antibodies will be contacted to determine if medical treatment is required.

In related news, the Red Sox Foundation on Wednesday announced the creation of an emergency hardship fund to help needy people in New England or southwest Florida [home of the team’s spring training complex] obtain food during the pandemic.

The Foundation started the program with $300,000. Red Sox ownership, players and coaches provided additional funding.

Applications for a $250 grocery store gift card are available at redsoxfoundation.org/hardship.

The Red Sox Foundation also made a $250,000 donation to the City of Boston’s Resiliency Fund to help purchase computers for students now working from home and a $100,000 donation to the Massachusetts COVID-19 Relief Fund established by Governor Charlie Baker and his wife, Lauren.


Peter Abraham can be reached at peter.abraham@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @PeteAbe.

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